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We here at Students For Liberty want to share some of the many success stories of liberty worldwide, so we have launched a series of “Facts For Liberty” in an attempt to tell you just why we think that liberty is the way to solve many of the world’s problems.

The story we’re trying to tell here isn’t about how one reform suddenly turned everything alright – many of the countries mentioned still have many issues – but rather that a little good can come out of trusting each other and believing that the market and the communities are able to solve problems better than centralized agencies and politicians. Feel very free to share these facts on social media or print them out and use them on campus for tabling purposes.

Privately owned rivers and lakes in Scotland helps conserve the land

 

In most countries, the government is responsible for the conservation of fishing rivers and lakes. But not in Scotland: The country famously known for its well-maintained salmon stream have 100% private ownership over fishing rivers and lakes. It has been this way for centuries giving owners clear incentives to conserve the value of their own land.

The following is a guest post by Young Voices Advocate PierreGuy Veer.

Today is Earth Day, environmentalists’ annual celebration to raise awareness of supposedly pressing issues like climate change and pollution. Like many events of the green sort, reasonable people should be ready to be subjected to a barrage of denigrating capitalism and praising the state. Since greedy capitalists only care about profits, the state needs to ensure that the environment is clean, right?

Well, not quite. Actually, government action is the surest way to have an environmental Armageddon, and that’s an understatement. Take the former communist world for example, where 100% of the economy was in the hands of the state. In the USSR, massive irrigation completely dried out the Aral Sea. The drainage was so intense that the soil for the agriculture it was supporting became completely sterile and polluted with all the insecticides and fertilizers that were used.

In Mao’s China, the regime’s attempt to industrialize the country called the Great Leap Forward was not only a miserable failure but also accelerated erosion. Small-scale wood-powered furnaces were used to make low-quality steel on a massive scale. The pollution emitted from this disastrous program nearly wiped out the evergreen trees in the Sichuan region.

Despite some free-market reformations in the 1980s, China still has an all-powerful government controlling vast spans of the economy, opening the doors to corruption. Indeed, Professor Yuhua Wang of the University of Pennsylvania discovered that many polluting industries’ business leaders used to be local bureaucrats. As a result, they still have high returns on investment during high-smog days where officials try to limit industrial activity. So, ordinary citizens of major Chinese cities like Beijing and Shanghai should not expect to see a clear sky anytime soon.

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By Rasmus Brygger

We here at Students For Liberty want to share some of the many success stories of liberty worldwide, so we have launched a series of “Facts For Liberty” in an attempt to tell you just why we think that liberty is the way to solve many of the world’s problems.

The story we’re trying to tell here isn’t about how one reform suddenly turned everything alright – many of the countries mentioned still have many issues – but rather that a little good can come out of trusting each other and believing that the market and the communities are able to solve problems better than centralized agencies and politicians. Feel very free to share these facts on social media or print them out and use them on campus for tabling purposes.

Hospital privatization in Georgia lead to more hospitals and cheaper medicine 

 

The Republic of Georgia has privatized its hospital market and liberalized the pharmaceutical market: more than 100 new hospitals built in 2 years and drugs become 30% cheaper.

By Rasmus Brygger

We here at Students For Liberty want to share some of the many success stories of liberty worldwide, so we have launched a series of “Facts For Liberty” in an attempt to tell you just why we think that liberty is the way to solve many of the world’s problems.

The story we’re trying to tell here isn’t about how one reform suddenly turned everything alright – many of the countries mentioned still have many issues – but rather that a little good can come out of trusting each other and believing that the market and the communities are able to solve problems better than centralized agencies and politicians. Feel very free to share these facts on social media or print them out and use them on campus for tabling purposes.

India’s economy grew after removing market regulations

India used to be very centrally controlled and strictly regulated. For example, a company could risk having to get 80 licenses from different governmental agencies. India has seen tremendous growth in the private sector after liberalization starting in the 90′s.

Are you interested in the role of the American legal institutions in limiting government? Do you want to engage in an online interactive discussion the history of the judiciary and the ways judicial action can limit the size and scope of government? Would you like to win a free copy of the critically-acclaimed new book “Terms of Engagement: How Our Courts Should Enforce the Constitution’s Promise of Limited Government”? Then join us for an exciting new online webinar this upcoming Thursday evening at 8:00pm EST / 5:00pm PST with Institute for Justice Senior Attorney Clark Neily. See below for further details about the webinar and book contest.

The U.S. Constitution was designed to protect individuals from the illegitimate exercise of government power. Unfortunately, the judiciary’s abdication of its duty to serve as a meaningful check on the other branches has led to an explosion in the cost, size and intrusiveness of government. In this webinar, Institute for Justice Senior Attorney Clark Neily will explain how this result came to be and why it can only be remedied through the consistent application of “judicial engagement” —or a genuine quest for truth regarding the government’s ends and means in all constitutional cases, with no exceptions.

Register Here | Facebook Event Here

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